Where is the work?

Fine Art MA show at S1 Basement, Trafalgar Street, Sheffield.

Friday 7th Private View

8th - 15th June Monday to Saturday 10am - 4pm

Visit www.whereistheworksheffield.blogspot.co.uk/

Exposed Magazine: http://www.exposedmagazine.co.uk/culture/culture-cat/2013/06/09/Where_is...
AN Magazine: http://www.a-n.co.uk/interface/reviews/single/3464832

http://www.thestar.co.uk/what-s-on/out-about/art-shows-work-in-progress-...

In museums and other cultural institutions the finished art object is

seen as the work. In the gallery, the text next to the object shown

explains both process and concept; but all the viewer ‘sees’ is the

final work.

We ask what happens to the rest.

The object and its production cannot be separated or

distinguished from each other. The exhibition is a single

moment, frozen in time. Process, labour, research, failures,

sleepless nights, and defining moments of clarity are left

unseen. Are these stages no longer important? We

cannot ‘see’ a thought, but that does not make it invisible.

The work is considered finished because it is framed,

installed, exhibited. It is easy to consider this the end, but

if there is an end, there must also be a beginning. Drives

continue. The personal struggle goes on. The work

exhibited is no more than a lucid interlude in its life of

production. As this process existed before, it goes on to

exist afterwards.

The artistic culmination of our constant internal negotiation is what

is shown to the viewer. This does not mean that these negotiations

now cease. They are part of the artist. They are the work.

Where is the Work? asks the viewer to consider a space in which

process holds as much value as any traditional idea of the

completed artwork.

Everything is the work.

Where is the work?
Tags: 
S1 Artspace
Sheffield
MA Fine Art Show
Sheffield Hallam University
Emma O'connor
Sarah Jane Palmer
madeleine Walton
rachel Smith
Helen Frank
Charlotte Riley
Sue Taylor
Abbie Canning
Mark Beachell
Louise Finney
Katrin Lübs

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